Tuesday, October 14, 2008

May Peace Prevail


The United Methodist Church architecture is profoundly bland, but the welcome sign is out while the doors are open. A post near the entrance expresses hope for peace in six languages. I'm fairly sure that five of them are English, Spanish, Chinese, Hebrew, and Arabic. The sixth, to the left of the Arabic pictured below, has me stumped. Could it be Portuguese?

10 comments:

Jules said...

What a wonderful idea. We need more Peace!!!

Hilda said...

Lovely! I wish more people thought that way.

Virginia said...

I always wanted to get a Peace Pole for our school. I think they are wonderful. Can't help you on the language question.

Benjamin Madison said...

Probably Kashaya, one of the Pomo languages.

Amy Wachspress said...

Persian maybe?
I love this sign! I want one for my yard.

D.C. Confidential said...

Wow! What a really cool sign. I'd go to church there. Can I get one of these for my home?

Petrea said...

I wish more political leaders (ahem) agreed. I don't know what language it is. If it's Portuguese, Monica or Rose at PDP would know.

Dina said...

Yay UMC! Glad to see the Hebrew.
That sixth language is strange...
I know only two peace poles--at the Dormition Abbey on Mt. Zion and of course at Heifer Ranch.
Shalom to you!

pasadenaadjacent.com said...

How old is the church?. It's has a kind of frontier veneer. I'm sure there is an architectural term for it, don't know it though.

USelaine said...

Thanks everyone. I really don't know anything about the origins of this peace post/pole, but I'm sure anyone could create one.

Benjamin, the Pomo idea is intriguing. Have you more information about that?

PA - There's a concrete block near the walkway that has the year 1909 embedded in it. There may have been an earlier building on the site. The sanctuary is sort of that A-frame roof on cinderblock style that makes me think of economical 1950s. If there's anything of the frontier era here, it's been severely remodeled and added on to. That steeple is sort of at the "L" juncture of the building, not on a leading edge of a rectangle like a classic Currier and Ives illustration.

Salaam, shalom, and peace to you all.